READING

i like to read a book like i drink a bottle of whisky. I consume it in one sitting if possible but not very often.

 i don't read often but when i do i prefer to read in a hammock.  and i like to turn the page from behind my head.

i don't read often but when i do i prefer to read in a hammock.  and i like to turn the page from behind my head.

my latest binge read was rudy wurlitzer's, the drop edge of yonder.  the book is a cross between jeremiah johnson and uncle boom who can recall his past lives.  does that not sound like the greatest mash up ever? apparently there's a sub genre of the western called "acid western" but that sounds as silly to me as "neo neo realism", a genre that i was a part of.  it's a western written from a buddhist perspective.... to live is inherently painful until you reach enlightenment and the flame of our existence simply blows out... but wtf do i know.  my friend siwat, who was ordained as a monk, told me something like that at the 11th st bar many years ago.

rudy wurlitzer is a famed american writer of books and scripts and i believe i live around the corner from him in hudson, ny.  the word "cult" is often in the same sentence as "writer" when his work is discussed.  i have always been titillated with the word "cult" ever since i saw it written in reference to movie on those little handmade signs at kim's underground..... the bleeker st location that is now a cvs or something.  as much as us cinephiles love the genre of the "cult movie, novel or band", the artists that have created that work usually resent being categorized in that way... probably since "cult" is in reference to a "cult audience", aka "not a mass audience".

an unrelated question: "can there be a "cult" dop? and would that be robby muller?

another unrelated question: why is sonic youth considered a popular rock band when amon duul II is a "cult band".... when they basically sound the same!!!!????

another unrelated question:  how do you make an "umlaut" on a mac?

please keep in mind that the following information is hearsay and unconfirmed.  legend and current gossip have it that wurlitzer wrote a transcendental western script called "zebulon" that passed through many hands and eventually was to be made by jim jarmucsh.  some sources say that film was at one point called "ghost dog", not to be confused with the urban ny film starring forest whitaker jarmucsh would eventually go on to make, also titled "ghost dog".  eventually they parted ways and the project never materialized.  time passed and wurlitzer saw the new jarmush film, dead man, and either he himself (or others?) felt it drastically resembles the script "ghost dog", "zebulon" or whatever it was called.  so much so that former filmmaker and current career revisionist, alex cox, seems to like to bring it up often and to this day.  

 johnny depp, although wonderful, is way too handsome to play the mountain man, zebulon, who walks between two worlds.  its more of a viggo mortesen role.

johnny depp, although wonderful, is way too handsome to play the mountain man, zebulon, who walks between two worlds.  its more of a viggo mortesen role.

i am not so interested if wurlitzer's script resembled the completed "dead man",  instead i am impressed and admire that the writer was able to take an idea, shop the screenplay though the industry, have the story be compromised along the way, passed around like a joint at a party and then after all that; complete and fortify that very idea into a book of it's own...   what a heroic act.

maybe it would be better for all of our ideas to be picked over by others, stolen and twisted into something other than our own.  let the low hanging fruit fall....  forcing us to reach deeper, making more original work and diverting us from obvious choices.  to get any film made is nearly impossible and "dead man" turned out to be a perfect film, (although the amazing soundtrack is a tad over used...... ).  for wurlitzer's story to go through so many incarnations until it's reached the form of a novel is a miracle and none the less, a perfect book.

do either of these works negate the other even if they were both potentially spawned from one source ?  

nope......